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Murder in the SunMorgue
by Denis O'Brien, PhD

Who killed hundreds of Syrian children in Ghouta, Aug21|2013? How, and why?

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Antinomian Opinion Page


June 6, 2016

                                               

People who know the least about Ali are 
the people now writing the most about him. 

You had to be there to know why this guy was so great
    

   
One of these guys was bald as a cue ball, 
the other one cried openly at his funeral.

I have been on the road the last three weeks Ė literally on the road, driving through the broiling southwest. And over the final couple of days I have heard and read dozens of MSM articles about Muhammad Aliís death, his history, his legacy. Apparently, judging by the content, all of these MSM reports have been written by people too young to have lived through Aliís rise to fame. IOW they were written by people who donít know what they were writing about. Let me give two quick examples of what I mean.

They never called me "nigger."

The first example is universal and is epitomized in two HuffPo articles, one by  Justin Block and the other by Ron Dicker, both of whom are probably, like most of their readers, too young to have any real clue who Ali was or why he was so amazing. Like the rest of the MSM, both Block and Dicker seriously misrepresent Aliís famous comment on why he was resisted the draft and refused to fight in Vietnam. This is the way Dicker quotes Ali: " ĎI ainít got no quarrel with them Viet Cong,í [Ali] famously declared."

No, thatís not what Ali "famously declared." Thatís the PC euphemism. The quote about the Vietnamese that made the headlines during the war was the "they never called me a nigger" observation:

My conscience won't let me go shoot my brother, or some darker people, or some poor hungry people in the mud for big powerful America. And shoot them for what? They never called me nigger, they never lynched me, they didn't put no dogs on me, they didn't rob me of my nationality, rape and kill my mother and father. ... Shoot them for what? How can I shoot them poor people? Just take me to jail.

Sure, thereís the contemporary problem of political correctness that discourages today's writers from using the word "nigger," but Aliís statement was possibly the most powerful statement about war Ė and not just the Vietnam war Ė that any public figure had spoken since FDR called Dec07.1941 a day that would live in infamy. It deserves to be quoted verbatim to deliver the full force of Ali's punch.

The tragedy is that over the last half-century cowardly writers have failed or refused to revive Aliís anti-war viewpoint as America waded into and butchered poor brown people -- mostly Muslims -- of numerous countries. How many of the 1 million Iraqis America has butchered ever did anything to harm Americans?

Howard Cosell

The second example of how clueless contemporary reporters are about Ali is the fact that in dozens of articles I have read and heard in the last couple of days, not a single one mentions Howard Cosell.

Cosell was a sports broadcaster for ABC who became famous for his ringside TV broadcasts of Ali's fights.  Ali and Cosell had many on-camera discussions that were funny, intense, and very, very to the point.  In many ways Ė particularly in the eye of WASPs of the 60's and 70's Ė Cosell was a Jewish mirror-image of Ali. He was outrageous, brash, rude, egotistic, annoying, but also principled, and in the long run . . . right. Ali and Cosell became, in a sense, as much a team as Abbott and Costelo and Laurel and Hardy.

I say Cosell was "principled" and "right" because Cosell alone among all TV personalities, politicians, and sports figures at the time defended his friend, Ali, against the adverse public opinion caused by Aliís refusal to be drafted and fight the white manís war in Vietnam. Ali didnít stand up alone against the establishment; he and Cosell stood up against the establishment together Ė the obnoxious black guy, the obnoxious Jew. Sure, it was Ali who risked going to jail and who lost millions in fight revenue, but it was Cosell who did more than anyone to explain Aliís position to the public, to defend that position, and to rehabilitate Ali in the publicís eye.  When Cosell died in 1995, Ali wept openly during the funeral.

One would think that the least these people writing about Ali could do would be to give Cosell a hat-tip, but then again, most of these kids playing like theyíre reporters donít know what the hell theyíre writing about. They just re-mash each otherís wiki-crap and put their name on it.

                  

Denis R. O'Brien, PhD/Esq.
denis [at-sign] logophere [full stop] com

 

 

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